Arc Review: Storm and Fury

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Title: Storm and Fury (The Harbinger #1)

Author: Jennifer Armentrout

Pub date: June 11, 2019

Rating: 5/5 Stars

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Note: I received a free copy of the book from Harlequin Teen through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.


Eighteen-year-old Trinity Marrow may be going blind, but she can see and communicate with ghosts and spirits. Her unique gift is part of a secret so dangerous that she’s been in hiding for years in an isolated compound fiercely guarded by Wardens—gargoyle shape-shifters who protect humankind from demons. If the demons discover the truth about Trinity, they’ll devour her, flesh and bone, to enhance their own powers.

When Wardens from another clan arrive with disturbing reports that something out there is killing both demons and Wardens, Trinity’s safe world implodes. Not the least because one of the outsiders is the most annoying and fascinating person she’s ever met. Zayne has secrets of his own that will upend her world yet again—but working together becomes imperative once demons breach the compound and Trinity’s secret comes to light. To save her family and maybe the world, she’ll have to put her trust in Zayne. But all bets are off as a supernatural war is unleashed…


My Spoiler-Free Review:

Note: I received a free copy of the book from Harlequin Teen through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

Storm and Fury is one of those books that makes you want to crawl inside and live in the world the author creates. The premise of human-stone guardian hybrids, called Wardens, fighting off demons hidden throughout the world of humans is a really interesting concept, and Armentrout pulls it off believably. The main character, Trinity, is an easy character to love. She’s human enough to experience purely human moments, but she also has a little bit of something extra that gives her some oomph, especially later on in the book. Also, major props to Armentrout for creating a female character who is naturally stronger than any other male in the book.

I think the strongest part of this book is how real the relationships are, even among mythical creatures. Trinity faces many intricate romantic situations throughout the book, many of which are probably relatable to teens today. Often in YA, we see insta-love relationships, which can get tiring. The primary relationship in Storm and Fury isn’t insta-love by any means, and further revelations make the relationship messier. I also appreciated how Armentrout honestly depicts sexuality in a young, explorative relationship. It’s high time that YA books, especially fantasy, show young characters exploring their sexuality in safe, tentative ways.

Overall, this book rocked my world for the few short days that I sped through it, and I can’t wait for the next book in the series. (The ending makes it very obvious which direction the series is heading in!) If you have the chance to get your hands on this book, I’d seriously recommend it.

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1 Comment

  1. April 5, 2019 / 8:54 pm

    This book definitely sounds like a read I’d enjoy. Thanks for the recommendation for me to add onto my TBR list!

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